Donaghadee is a small town in County Down, Northern Ireland. It lies on the northeast coast of the Ards Peninsula, about 18 miles east of Belfast and about six miles south east of Bangor. Donaghadee is probably best known for its lighthouse and harbour.

There has been a haven for ships at Donaghadee (locally known colloquially as the ‘Dee’) for centuries, and there has also existed a harbour since at least the 17th century.

Viscount Montgomery’s harbour (1626; improved 1640), superseding what had hitherto been probably only a small jetty, was built and maintained as a result of the Royal Warrant of 1616 which limited travel between the Ards and the Rhins of Galloway to this port, and that at Portpatrick also owned by Montgomery.

Much patched and decrepit, the quay was virtually rebuilt, though along the original line, between 1775 and 1785 by the landlord, Daniel Delacherois, probably with the help of John Smeaton, the distinguished civil engineer who had apparently made earlier more elaborate plans for extending the harbour, and who had just rebuilt Portpatrick harbour.

The old quay remained until after the completion of the new harbour, and then, despite its continued favour by local fishermen, was removed for local wall building about 1833.

It is a stunning view from the lighthouse. I struggled massively with the light and quickly found the resultant image through the hybrid viewfinder on the X100 didn’t necessarily match the exposure of the final image.

All photos were taken on the Fujifilm FinePix X100. More from the set can be found on Flickr.