In Lisburn’s Market Square is the statue to one of Britain’s war heroes who upheld the status quo of British rule in India.

Having served several wars between 1839-1857 Brigadier General John Nicholson died trying to retake the Lahore Gate. Footage of Wallace’s Fountain from 1872 just yards away.


Under the Hillsborough Road bridge. The Lagan River separates County Antrim and County Down.

The Gas Works Lisburn

The last remain pipe from the old Lisburn Gas Company. The company was formed in 1837 and supplied fuel for the gas lighting around the town. The company was to be taken over in 1975. The Gas Works site was demolished a number of years later.

I nearly missed this building in Bridge Street. The site was cleared a number of years ago yet a small chest of drawers remains in place on the upper floor of the building. Can’t help wonder if there is anything in the drawers.


The museum of local history is based in Lisburn’s 17th Century Market House in the centre of the City. It brings to life the history of linen and its importance to Lisburn.


The Old Blaris Cemetery containing two rather solid memorials to two officers of our once far-flung empire. Described by Fred McKee “Two eminent Inspector-Generals of the Chinese Customs, Sir Robert Hart and Sir Frederick Maze. They are almost identical, except that on the Hart memorial, on a copper plate, is a statement in raised lettering in Chinese.”

You can find more photos from the photo walk on flickr here.